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Teens with TBI's

Public·17 TBI Teen
Brent Sullivan
Brent Sullivan

CFD 2012 R2 X64 Extensions [EXCLUSIVE] Crack



Calculating the cost of an emergency medical services (EMS) system using a standardized method is important for determining the value of EMS. This article describes the development of a methodology for calculating the cost of an EMS system to its community. This includes a tool for calculating the cost of EMS (the "cost workbook") and detailed directions for determining cost (the "cost guide"). The 12-step process that was developed is consistent with current theories of health economics, applicable to prehospital care, flexible enough to be used in varying sizes and types of EMS systems, and comprehensive enough to provide meaningful conclusions. It was developed by an expert panel (the EMS Cost Analysis Project [EMSCAP] investigator team) in an iterative process that included pilot testing the process in three diverse communities. The iterative process allowed ongoing modification of the toolkit during the development phase, based upon direct, practical, ongoing interaction with the EMS systems that were using the toolkit. The resulting methodology estimates EMS system costs within a user-defined community, allowing either the number of patients treated or the estimated number of lives saved by EMS to be assessed in light of the cost of those efforts. Much controversy exists about the cost of EMS and whether the resources spent for this purpose are justified. However, the existence of a validated toolkit that provides a standardized process will allow meaningful assessments and comparisons to be made and will supply objective information to inform EMS and community officials who are tasked with determining the utilization of scarce societal resources. 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.




CFD 2012 R2 X64 Extensions Crack



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The Emergency Mask (EM) is considered a secondary response emergency Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) designed to provide respiratory protection to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers in response to a post-fire event or ammonia leak. The EM is planned to be delivered to ISS in 2012 to replace the current air purifying respirator (APR) onboard ISS called the Ammonia Respirator (AR). The EM is a one ]size ]fits ]all model designed to fit any size crewmember, unlike the APR on ISS, and uses either two Fire Cartridges (FCs) or two Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) 3M(Trademark). Ammonia Cartridges (ACs) to provide the crew with a minimum of 8 hours of respiratory protection with appropriate cartridge swap ]out. The EM is designed for a single exposure event, for either post ]fire or ammonia, and is a passive device that cannot help crewmembers who cannot breathe on their own. The EM fs primary and only seal is around the wearer fs neck to prevent a crewmember from inhaling contaminants. During the development of the ISS Emergency Mask, several design challenges were faced that focused around manufacturing a leak free mask. The description of those challenges are broadly discussed but focuses on one key design challenge area: bonding EPDM gasket material to Gore(Registered Trademark) fabric hood.


The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) conducts international collaboration activities in support of U.S. policies and objectives regarding the accelerated risk reduction and remediation of environmental legacy of the nations' nuclear weapons program and government sponsored nuclear energy research. The EM International Program supported out of the EM Office of the Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions and private industry to assist in identifying technologies and promote international collaborations that leverage resources and link international experience and expertise. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, the International Program awarded eightmore international collaborative projects for work scope spanning waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) and nuclear materials disposition initiatives to seven foreign organizations. Additionally, the International Program's scope and collaboration opportunities were expanded to include technical as well as non-technical areas. This paper will present an overview of the on-going tasks awarded in FY 2012 and an update of upcoming international activities and opportunities for expansion into the remainder of FY 2013 and beyond. (authors) less


The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) conducts international collaboration activities in support of U.S. policies and objectives regarding the accelerated risk reduction and remediation of environmental legacy of the nations' nuclear weapons program and government sponsored nuclear energy research. The EM International Program supported out of the EM Office of the Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions and private industry to assist in identifying technologies and promote international collaborations that leverage resources and link international experience and expertise. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, the International Program awarded eightmore international collaborative projects for work scope spanning waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) and nuclear materials disposition initiatives to seven foreign organizations. Additionally, the International Program's scope and collaboration opportunities were expanded to include technical as well as non-technical areas. This paper will present an overview of the on-going tasks awarded in FY 2012 and an update of upcoming international activities and opportunities for expansion into FY 2013 and beyond. (authors) less


In 2012, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) reaffirmed that domestic violence is a serious public health hazard that emergency medical services (EMS) personnel will encounter. Many victims of domestic violence may refuse transport to the hospital, making EMS prehospital field personnel --EMTs and paramedics-- their only contact with healthcare providers. Despite these facts, the interaction of field EMS personnel and victims of domestic violence remains largely unexamined. Given the importance of the interaction of field EMS personnel have with victims of domestic violence, the goal of this study is to explore attitudes about and experiences of EMS personnel on the issue of domestic violence after completing a training on domestic violence. Participants were recruited by researchers contacting multiple EMS agencies. Data were gathered using a survey attached to an online domestic violence training for field EMS personnel (EMTs and paramedics) circulated in a large southern state. Participants were able to obtain continuing education credits for completing the online modules. A total of 403 respondents completed the survey. 71% of respondents indicated that they frequently encounter patients who disclose domestic violence; 45% believe that if a victim does not disclose abuse, there is little they can do to help; and from 32% to 43% reported assumptions and attitudes that indicate beliefs that victims are responsible for the abuse. Implications of the data are discussed suggesting that EMS providers are aware that they frequently assist victims of domestic violence, yet many continue to endorse common myths and negative attitudes about victims. Core components of training that can educate EMS personnel about the dynamics of domestic violence are described, and a new free online training for medical professionals on domestic violence is offered for use as part of ongoing education to enhance the EMS response to victims. Copyright 2015 Elsevier Ltd


Resumo Contexto O consumo de crack é um dos grandes desafios em saúde pública, e o uso dessa droga tem efeitos diretos na saúde de seus usuários. Objetivos Avaliar o perfil das alterações vasculares em pacientes com dependência de crack em Centro de Atenção Psicossocial para Álcool e Drogas (CAPS-AD) e observar os possíveis efeitos vasculares periféricos. Métodos Trata-se de um estudo observacional, descritivo, de corte transversal. Os pacientes da amostra foram submetidos a um questionário objetivo para avaliar questões demográficas, padrão de uso da droga, coexistência de diabetes melito, hipertensão arterial ou tabagismo, exame físico e ecográfico. Os dados foram sumarizados e analisados estatisticamente com teste qui-quadrado ou teste exato de Fisher. Resultados A média de idade da amostra foi de 33,29 (7,15) anos, e 74% eram do gênero masculino. A média de idade de início de uso da droga foi de 23,4 (7,78) anos, com tempo médio de uso de 9,58 (5,64) anos. O consumo médio diário de pedras de crack foi de 21,45 (8,32) pedras. A alteração de pulsos em membros inferiores foi mais frequente em mulheres. A prevalência do espessamento da parede arterial nos membros inferiores foi de 94,8%. O tempo de uso da droga apresentou associação estatística (p = 0,0096) com alteração do padrão de curva espectral das artérias dos membros inferiores. Conclusões Há alterações vasculares periféricas em usuários de crack. O tempo de uso da droga exerceu um maior impacto nesse sistema, o que sugere associação entre o uso do crack e a diminuição de fluxo arterial.


Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are often the first medical providers to begin resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims. The universal Basic Life Support Termination of Resuscitation (BLS-TOR) rule is a validated clinical prediction tool used to identify patients in which continued resuscitation efforts are futile. The primary aim is to compare the rate of transport of OHCA cases before and after the implementation of a BLS-TOR protocol and to determine the compliance rate of EMS personnel with the new protocol in a largely volunteer, rural system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the statewide EMS electronic patient care report system. Cases were identified by searching for any incident that had a primary impression of "cardiac arrest" or a primary symptom of "cardiorespiratory arrest" or "death." Data were collected from the two years prior to and following implementation of the BLS-TOR rule from January 1, 2012 through March 31, 2016. There were 702 OHCA cases were identified, with 329 cases meeting inclusion criteria. The transport rate was 91.1% in the pre-intervention group compared with 69.4% in the post-intervention group (χ2=24.8; p


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